Practice Theories

Public Theology

Today’s observance of the Memorial Day holiday in the U.S. has me thinking of the two past APT Biennial conferences on migration (2016) and on public theology (2014).  We invite you to comment below about your thoughts on the intersection … Continue reading

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Dale Andrews on Martin Luther King, Jr.

“King’s nonviolent civil disobedience strategies to combat racism as well as poverty and militarism were shaped by an evolving critical theological methodology, which determined his four steps to any nonviolent campaign: collection of facts to expose injustice; mutual negotiation with … Continue reading

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Musical Practice and Practical Theology

One of the pleasures of practical theology for me has been the freedom to learn about practice in different environments and to bring that learning ‘into’ the theological estimations of practice ingredient to practical theology — and to experiment with … Continue reading

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“Religious Practice” as a Legal Concept (and Practical Theology)

As a parent of a middle-schooler, I was interested to read our middle-school’s policies at the beginning of a new school year. I saw the nondiscrimination policy includes not only no discrimination on the basis of “religion” but also on … Continue reading

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Practices with Their Own Playlists

Recently, on the podcast Sound Opinions, I heard a news report about recent research into music listening practices that was funded by (and used streaming data from) Spotify. (You can hear it here at the front end of the podcast.) … Continue reading

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Was ist los, Stuttgart? Kirchentag! Part 1 of 2

I didn’t know that my recent visit to Stuttgart, Germany, would coincide with Kirchentag – because I had never heard of Kirchentag. But as soon as I stepped out of the train station, I saw people, young and old, sporting … Continue reading

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Representing Practice: An Assist from Dwight Conquergood, Part 3 of 3

Part 1 is here. Part 2 is here. What has been missing for me so far in Conquergood’s theory of the representation of practice through performance is a sufficiently subtle account of how the four traps that lay in wait … Continue reading

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Representing Practice: An Assist from Dwight Conquergood, Part 2

Part 1 is here. Conquergood provides four different ways of representing the practice of others, drawn in the service of a “moral mapping of performative stances towards the other” (p. 5). First is “The Custodian’s Rip-Off.” When we characterize practice … Continue reading

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